Zika Update: A New Way to Test for This Infection

Blood sample positive with Zika virusThe CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) recently updated its guidelines concerning the testing of pregnant women who have a possible Zika virus infection or exposure.  It must always be noted that most people with the Zika virus infection are either asymptomatic or have mild clinical symptoms.  Mild clinical symptoms can be an acute onset of a fever, a rash, joint pain, and/or conjunctivitis.

There is new data suggesting that the virus can be detected in the blood and urine for 2 weeks after the infection begins.  This testing of the urine and blood for the virus should be performed for:

  • Symptomatic pregnant women in less than 2 weeks after the symptoms begin
  • Asymptomatic pregnant women in less than 2 weeks after a possible exposure

After this 2-week window, blood testing should begin for the Zika virus IgM antibody, which the body makes in response to a new Zika virus infection.  If this is found to be positive, there was definitely an infection and close fetal evaluation should begin.

As always, you should discuss the Zika virus problem with your health care provider so you can get the best possible care.

-Dr. P

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What Could Happen if You Smoke During Pregnancy?

We all know that cigarette smoking is a health hazard.  In pregnancy, smoking spreads that hazard to the baby as well as the mom.  The CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) provides us with the following information:

  • It is reported that 10% of women smoke during the last 3 months of pregnancy
  • 50% of women who smoke before a pregnancy will quit during the pregnancy
  • 50% of women who stopped smoking during a pregnancy will go back to smoking after their baby is born
  • Smoking increases the difficulty to become pregnant
  • Smoking increases the risk of spontaneous miscarriages
  • Smoking also increases the risk of a premature birth
  • This action increases nicotine and decreases oxygen to the developing fetus
  • The baby’s placenta may not work as well in mothers who smoke
  • Smoking increases the risk of certain birth defects, including cleft lip and cleft palate

If you smoke, please try to stop for your health and the health of your baby.

Cigarette Blog

-Dr. P

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Crucial Tdap Vaccination Recommendations for Pregnant Women

…..Let us now summarize the Tdap vaccination recommendations as advisCDC_09[1]ed by the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists:

  • Pregnant women should receive the Tdap vaccine with each pregnancy, and the ideal timing is during 27 to 36 weeks of the pregnancy.
  • With the preceding plan, there is an increased likelihood of optimal protection against pertussis for the pregnant woman and her infant during the first few months of the baby’s life.
  • All women during each pregnancy should receive the vaccine whether or not she has received the vaccine in the past.
  • If the pregnant woman has not received the vaccine during the pregnancy, it should be administered immediately after delivery.
  • To date there is no data to suggest increased fetal, maternal, or pregnancy risks with the vaccine, but the safety should be closely monitored under the direction of the Food and Drug Administration.
  • Although not part of the new immunization schedule recommendations, experts are advising vaccinations for the new baby’s father, siblings, and other caretakers.  This is part of the cocooning strategy.  Even grandma and grandpa should consider vaccination.

…..As always, discuss all your concerns with your caring medical professional so you can obtain the best care possible for you and your family!

-Dr. P

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The New Outbreak of Pertussis in Babies


Little Baby M.O.
Over the past decade, there has been a large increase in the incidence of pertussis (whooping cough) in the United States, with over 40,000 cases being reported in 2012.  What is of great concern is the large number of infants being affected.

The CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) reports that most pertussis hospitalizations and deaths occurred among children under 3 months old.  Babies do not receive their first pertussis vaccine until two months of age, and they are not fully protected until after their third shot, which comes at about six months.  Over the first six months of life our babies are at a high risk of getting very sick if they develop this bacterial infection.

In order to combat this new outbreak of pertussis, in January 2013, the CDC released a new immunization schedule.  This recommended that a dose of Tdap vaccine be given to all women during each pregnancy whether or not she had received the vaccine previously.  This was a change from their previous recommendations which suggested that the vaccine be given only to pregnant women who had never received this vaccine.

-Dr. P

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Urgent Facts About Chlamydia, a Common STI

…..Sexually transmitted infections in adolescents continued…

…..CChlamydia Infohlamydia is one of the most common infectious diseases in the United States, with somewhere between 1 to 3 million cases each year among women ages 15 to 45. The most affected group is between ages 15 and 19, followed by 20 to 25 as the second most affected group.

…..One problem in finding this infection is that less than half of the most affected women are screened for Chlamydia trachomatis. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) guidelines suggest a yearly screening for chlamydia on all sexually active women who are 25 and younger, and testing should be performed for women over 25 if they have a new sexual partner or multiple partners. Women should also seek testing if they experience abdominal or pelvic pain, vaginal discharge, painful intercourse, pain with urination, or irregular bleeding.

…..Testing usually entails a speculum exam with a Q-tip swab of the cervix. If the speculum exam is a problem for the adolescent, then a vaginal swab can be performed. The patient can even collect a vaginal swab test privately if necessary.

…..After a woman is treated, reinfection is common, and having a treated infection does not provide immune protection against future infections. It is therefore advised that a repeat test be performed a few months after a treated infection.

…..If there is a delay in treatment of this infection, then there is an increased chance of developing an infection of the pelvis, called pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), which can lead to infertility. Some studies suggest that PID can develop in up to 30% of women with their first chlamydial infection.

…..There are many antibiotic treatment plans suggested by the CDC, and they all are very successful. The adolescent and her partner should avoid intercourse for 7 days after both partners have been treated.  Ideally, the patient should refer for testing any sexual partner that she encountered within the last 1-2 months.

-Dr. P

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